In a Friday statement, Paxton applauded the Supreme Court’s decision and reiterated his outrage over the San Antonio panel’s decision to block the 2013 maps that had been drawn the lower court. 

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Hanging over the Texas case is the possibility that the state will be placed back under federal oversight of its elections laws.

The state’s currents maps, which have been in place for the past three election cycles, were adopted by the Legislature in 2013. They’re largely based on temporary maps drawn by the three-judge panel in San Antonio amid legal wrangling over the maps lawmakers drew in 2011.

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“The lower court’s decisions to invalidate parts of the maps it drew and adopted are inexplicable and indefensible,” Paxton said.

The high court did not act on the Texas Democratic Party’s request to revive a legal claim over partisan gerrymandering — a redistricting strategy that until recently was deemed acceptable. The high court last year heard arguments in a Wisconsin case over the limits of partisan gerrymandering and whether extreme practices can be deemed unconstitutional. A ruling in that case is pending. The court has also agreed to consider a partisan gerrymandering case out of Maryland.

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