Corbyn electoral advisor resigns amid labor in crisis

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Jeremy Corbyn "is unable to win an election." At least that is what Andy Fisher thinks, who has announced that he will leave his post as electoral advisor amid attempts by the Labor leader to close the gap that has been opened in the party, largely on behalf of Brexit, but contrary to his Intentions seem to get bigger.

The warmth of Corbyn regarding his position on the United Kingdom's departure from the European Union makes even his closest friends mad. It is the case of Fisher, who in a very hard document that has been cited by the newspaper "The Sunday Times", further notes that Corbyn "has surrounded himself with a team without professionalism, without competition and without human decency."

This resignation occurs in the middle of the annual congress of the party in Brighton, in the south of England, which began last Saturday and will be closed on Wednesday with a speech by the politician, as expected by some as irrelevant to others, who suggest that it will be only one more on its endless list of contradictions.

It is estimated that the event will be settled with the attendance of more than 13,000 people, which for the leader could be an ideal opportunity to appease the heated tempers and clarify his position at once.

However, in the first two days the strong internal divisions through which the formation and the congress goes through have become more than a battlefield. Thus, the conference began with Jon Lansman's attempt to eliminate the "number two" position of the party, occupied by Tom Watson, with a motion presented to the National Executive Committee, although Corbyn put a stop to the vote that would decide whether Eliminated or not the charge.

This, despite the fact that Watson and Corbyn are not exactly close friends and have starred in some clashes, since Watson is in favor of Labor being positioned as a "proper stay" block in the EU and has even shown itself in favor of a second referendum. . Watson called the motion against his charge of "sectarian attack," an idea that was seconded by other relevant voices, such as that of former Prime Minister Tony Blair, who saw an "undemocratic" and "politically dangerous" act in the attempt.

In favor of a second referendum, Corbyn has also been willing, although in another sense. His latest plan, published this week in the newspaper "The Guardian", would be to avoid leaving the EU without agreement and, after winning his party early elections and taking over as prime minister, finally reach an agreement with Brussels about the Brexit that once accepted by the parties would be subjected to a popular consultation in which they would also ask people their preference to leave or stay.

Regulate in surveys
Corbyn says that for this vote he would maintain "a neutral position." Position that apparently has always wanted to maintain, but that ultimately has led him to move within the limits of an unbearable ambiguity that has caused the anger of both leaders and affiliates.

In fact, the latter have submitted more than 80 motions to request that in the final congress manifesto the party be positioned as a European pro.

This whole panorama clashes head-on with the idea with which Corbyn arrived at the congress: "Our conference will be fully united to defeat this conservative government."

The British opposition could have grabbed the saying that in troubled river, fishermen gain, but in the troubled waters of British politics, the only one that seems to continue to win is Boris Johnson, since according to the latest YouGov portal survey for «The Times »the intention to vote for conservatives would be 33% while for Labor would be 22%. .

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