Home » Business » How a law should combat the shortage of skilled workers

How a law should combat the shortage of skilled workers


Whether in construction, in crafts, in catering or in nursing: personnel are sought everywhere – the current economic downturn has not changed that either.
Picture: dpa

Roads, bridges, rails: construction is taking place in Germany. But often there is a shortage of workers. Can the new Immigration Act really help companies to remedy the chronic shortage of skilled workers?

Sroads, bridges, rails, noise control: construction work is taking place in Germany. Olaf Issinger, Wiesbaden branch manager of the construction company Eurovia, is therefore constantly looking for new employees. But they are not easy to find, which is why Issinger sometimes takes unusual paths. Last year, for example, he gave eight Croatian employees German courses from Berlitz. They took place directly on the construction site for around six months: first as an intensive course, then there were two hours of instruction each evening. The Croatians were released from their actual duties. Why is he investing so much time and money? Issinger laughs briefly. “Because we urgently need people.”

Britta Beeger

Eurovia is not the only company that would help if more workers came to Germany from abroad. Whether in construction, in crafts, in catering or in nursing: personnel are sought everywhere – the current economic downturn has not changed that either. According to the Institute for Labor Market and Vocational Research, 1.4 million jobs were recently vacant. Because now the baby boomers are also retiring, i.e. the high-birth cohorts of those born between 1955 and 1969, the shortages are likely to worsen significantly in the future.

,

Leave a Comment